The Whisper Correction

There are several aspects in our Conscious Classroom Management program.

Firstly, we look at Teacher Presence. It is the most significant aspect in the classroom; the teacher in the room in creating leadership and culture. Other aspects are Practical Strategies and Classroom Management and Teaching like:

  • Preventative Management Strategies
  • Supportive Management Strategies
  • Corrective Management Strategies

The Whisper Correction

The main idea is that we want to spend a lot of time and energy looking at what can prevent distraction and misbehaviour. But obviously, regardless of what we put in place, there are going to be times when we need to support our students to get back on task, and that’s the Supportive Management strategies.

Then there are the Corrective Management strategies. The reason I wanted to show you this is because I love Supportive Management Strategies in the classroom. As a teacher, especially if our presence is not right which is the first area of this conscious classroom management training, sometimes we can overreact to things that are not really big issues in regards to student behaviour or distraction.

Supportive Management strategies really look at supporting the student to get back on task without stopping the flow of the lesson or getting 30 people, who are now looking at our show, between the teacher and the student. In other words, if the teacher’s reaction is more than the student’s misbehaviour, that can stop the flow of the lesson.

I love the post by Doug Lemov where he has a short video clip which I’d like to show you. It’s about a teacher in his Math class, Jason Armstrong, and a technique called the Whisper Correction. I really love this and I wanted to show you how this works and how it relates to Supportive Management strategies.

At the 2:17 mark he whispers, “I’m writing, you’re writing. Don’t miss it.” It’s a very soft supportive correction which means there’s little interruption to the flow of the class.

The other thing I love in this scene 2:39 is you see that he’s walking around the classroom, so he’s constantly checking being present in the room.

You’ll see at 3:00, the girl at the front that he spoke to originally has got a hand up and her head is resting on her other arm on the table. And watch this correction at 3:09

“I’d call on you if you’d sit up next time.” What I really love about this is that the teacher has a strong presence in the room, doesn’t compromise on expectations and is consistently teaching not just the content but the behaviour and the procedures of the class consistently. The students then have a clear understanding about what is expected.

The other thing I liked about what the teacher did in 3:33 is not only did he whisper and look at the student but he also used his hands to gesture sitting up. A fantastic example of a Supportive Management strategy. Not only was he assisting the student to get back on task without interrupting the flow of the lesson, he was also teaching here not just the content but behaviour and the procedures of the class.

CLICK HERE to find out more about the NEW Conscious Classroom Management Training, which is now online.

What’s The Most Important Part Of Classroom Management?

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When I present my Classroom Management Training, I ask the teachers who attend:

What do you think is the most important aspect of Classroom Management?

The teachers provide some terrific, valid responses in which all of them are obviously critical in creating good classroom management. Things like:

  • Creating good rapport and relationships with the students
  • Being able to organize your classroom
  • Providing creative and engaging lessons
  • Being consistent

All of these are obviously critical in making sure that you have good classroom management of your class. However, if we would really be pushed to identify the most important, the most critical aspect of classroom management, I would have to say to you that would be Teacher Presence.

What's the Most Important Part of Classroom Management?

In the Conscious Classroom Management Training, the very first topic we look at just before morning tea is this idea of Teacher presence and how we develop it, what creates it. Of course the rest of the day, we then do look at classroom management strategies.

Teacher presence is who we are in the classroom, strategies is what we do in the classroom. The strategies are divided and systemized into:

  • Preventive strategies
  • Supportive strategies and,
  • Corrective strategies

The reason why Teacher presence is the most important aspect of classroom management is that all too often we may go racing in with different strategies to manage our classroom and if we don’t bring the correct presence into the room, who we are, well then the strategies obviously aren’t going to take hold and what we can do and what can be tempting is to blame the strategy, or worse, the students, the school or the parents – everyone else but the teacher. While this is a provocative and controversial concept at times, it’s very important to make sure that we understand that Teacher presence is important because it can save a lot of time.

One of the things we need to do is to look at what beliefs we have or what’s the mindset that we have. The question we need to ask ourselves if we are struggling to manage a class is:

Are the beliefs that I’m taking into that classroom working?
Am I feeling good about it?
Am I satisfied with the class?
Is it working with the students?

If the answers are No to that, well then we’ll need to analyse our own mindset and the negative beliefs and change them.

Firstly, identify the negative beliefs and then we need to challenge them and that’s how we change the beliefs.

Is that true that the student doesn’t want to learn?
Could there be other things that are driving that student’s behaviour?
What else is contributing to this?

We need to have a full analysis of what’s going on and that includes obviously looking at ourselves and the negativity or the negative mindset that we could be bringing into the class because that will affect who we are in the room and our presence. As Einstein says,

“The definition of insanity is doing the same thing over and over again and expecting a different result.”

If what you’re doing in a particular class is not working, it’s time to change that. It might very well be that you want to just come in to that class with a new mindset. That is a lot easier said than done and we have more information about this on our website,

https://www.humanconnections.com.au/

You may want to come to one of our trainings, and there are some testimonials below on this page that’ll give you some insights about how teachers found the Classroom Management Training.

Here is a small but powerful action step.  Identify the teachers in your school who have great presence?  You’ll know who they are because they are teachers who command respect and attention in the classroom or about walking into a classroom and the students will be giving them their attention even before the teacher asks for it. It would be very worthwhile to identify who they are and spend some time with them. You know who I’m talking about. You do have teachers like that in your school.

Don’t ask them what are the strategies you’re using, it would be good to pick their mind about how do they see teaching, how do they see the students. When they have a student who is misbehaving, how do they view that student? Pick their mindset and then model that.

I hope to see you at one of our Conscious Classroom Management Trainings this year. There’s only 4 in Sydney scheduled or perhaps you may want to email me at info@humanconnections.com.au. I’d be more than happy to help you out in any way or find out some more information on our website.

Here are testimonials from attendees at the Conscious Classroom Management Training in Sydney

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The strategies in the Conscious Classroom Management Training are good. Although I use most of these strategies, the way you employ and use them makes a difference.

Calvin Ambrose, Christian Brothers School

The video clips in the Conscious Classroom Management Training were entertaining. I find the importance of establishing clear teaching procedures useful – I’m certainly going to introduce this at the start of the new year; a very informative and practical workshop.

Eve Tsevekidis, Kingsgrove High School

I found the Conscious Classroom Management Training useful because it reinforces or renews information previously known.

Maria Duffy, Kingsgrove High School

Make the course in the Conscious Classroom Management Training a little bit longer so it is not so rushed. The psychology info at the beginning was good to.

Renée Beyer, Kirrawee High School

The Conscious Classroom Management Training will help me connect with students.

Shahrokh Ghahfarrokhi, Morisset High School

I like the emphasis on explicitly teaching rules, expectations and behaviour explicitly, just like any other aspects of the curriculum. The Conscious Classroom Management Workshop reignited my passion for teaching and belief that all students are worth teaching and want to learn! Thank you!

Radhika Dixon, Greenacre Public School

As a teacher in a behaviour or emotional disorder school, it was great to see that the strategies we have in place are what you recommend! I’m not sure I could use all the teaching or learning strategies in the Conscious Classroom Management Training but I will try to modify them and give some a go. I did find the presentation very engaging – you have great presence! It did seem high school focussed at times but I suppose it’s hard to give examples outside your own experience, although it would have been beneficial (for me) to have some stuff framed in a “primary setting” way. However, to be fair, my classroom of K-4 emotionally disturbed students probably doesn’t fit a high school or primary school environment!
I actually found that the extra slides that you showed at the beginning were incredibly beneficial and should be part of this presentation all the time. I visit mainstream teachers every week and they all want to know when and how I am going to “change” the student that is in my class before they return to mainstream of fix them. Realising that the students choose their behaviour and that you can’t make them change is a powerful piece of information or insight for all teachers. It frames beautifully everything else you present. Sorry about the essay!

Linda O’callaghan, Cook School

The Conscious Classroom Management Training reaffirmed a lot of what I was already doing (good stuff) and made me realise some of my negative approaches to management. This would be an excellent P.D. for teachers just starting their teaching profession (along with everyone else) as when people leave one and start teaching, they either have been told conflicting help on management or have no guidance whatsoever. This info is great and will support one into the rest of any career.

Helen Scevity, Menai High School

I highly recommend the Conscious Classroom Management Training for greater understanding and results.

Mark Ranftl, Wollemi College

The Conscious Classroom Management Training was very useful. There was intensive presentation and discussion about classroom management.

Welmince Djulete, Flinders University

The Conscious Classroom Management Training was interesting, informative and useful. The information is very practical and comprehensive.

Lilis Su’adah, Flinders University

The Conscious Classroom Management Training is useful because you used real cases.

Emma Fredman, Kensington Public School

I found the Conscious Classroom Management Training because of the practical examples.

Sara Vaccaro, Killarney Heights High School

The Conscious Classroom Management Training is very useful and practical. Thank you!

Marian Botros, Kirrawee High School

The Conscious Classroom Management Training delivered good ideas.

Jennifer Walters, St Peters Catholic College

The Conscious Classroom Management Training has good ideas. Its emphasis is on perception.

Michelle Schlyder, Trinity Grammar School

The Conscious Classroom Management Training has really inspiring techniques for helping me to make a change.

Lisa Blanche, Menai High School

The Big Ideas in the Conscious Classroom Management Training were very helpful to put things in place to create positive environment in the classroom. Thanks!

Anonymous

The Conscious Classroom Management Training’s content was relevant and confirmed some of my own beliefs.

Kieran Lowrie, St Peters Catholic College

I found you and your info very easy to understand and practical. There were moments in the Conscious Classroom Management Training when I could picture myself using the conversations and mindsets with specific students.

Jacqueline Hunt, Campbelltown Performing Arts High School

I’m very interested in attending the other course you run based on the information from the Conscious Classroom Management Training you gave us today. I felt the strategies appear practical to implement and I can see how I would implement them on who they would work.

Adrianna Allen, Campbelltown Performing Arts High School

The Conscious Classroom Management Training was an engaging and informative session that provided tools to help teachers connect with and support students. It gave me great ideas and also reinforced strategies I found I already use.

Elyssa May, Menai High School

The Conscious Classroom Management Training is absolutely mind-blowing. They need to teach this in uni or have it as part of an induction training. Rocky, thanks for this down-to-earth training. I recommend all teachers to this course.

Tania Mclaren, Swansea High School

I really liked your value system. That was the key. The same strategies with a different value system would not work.If you were interested in coming out to a school to run workshops with a group of beginning teachers (about 15 or so), I would be interested in talking with you about that.

John Wright, Castle Hill High School

Attendees from the following schools joined the Conscious Classroom Management Training in Sydney

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  • Kingsgrove High School
  • Mackellar Girls High School
  • Stellar Music School
  • Menai High School
  • Killarney Heights High School
  • Matraville Soldiers’ Settlement Public School
  • Abbotsleigh
  • St Peters Catholic College
  • Wollemi College
  • Cook School
  • Kirrawee High School
  • Campbelltown Performing Arts High School
  • Christian Brothers High School
  • Greenacre Public School
  • St Paul’s Catholic College
  • Trinity Grammar School
  • Kensington Public School
  • Covenant Christian School
  • Cherrybrook Technology High School
  • Castle Hill High School
  • Swansea High School
  • Kotara High
  • Flinders University
  • Morisset High School

Sign Up to The Online Conscious Classroom Management Training

Online Classroom Management Training

$197

Per Person Access to 17 Modules

Whole Staff Online Access

$990

Subscribe My School (Up to 100 Staff)

How To Influence Defiant Students

How To Influence Defiant Stidents
Here’s a photo of some of the lovely staff that came to the Accidental Counsellor Training in Penrith, Sydney, New South Wales Australia.

Tips on how to deal with defiant students

School staff find themselves dealing with students that are defiant and who really don’t want to make a change. Here are a couple of quick tips.

The first thing we need to do is to acknowledge the resistance. This sounds very simple but is very difficult to do. Often times, you might be speaking to a student who is skipping class or truanting. To be able to acknowledge the resistance, you can saying something like “You know, I can probably understand that you don’t want to come to school because you really don’t like it.”  A phrasing or statement that acknowledges the student’s resistance really creates rapport and helps us gain trust with the student.

Second, we need to talk about whether the student’s behavior is creating pain for them. This is leverage to help them consider change.  You might want to ask some statements or questions:

“Is what you’re doing working for you?”

“Are you sick and tired of doing this?”

“Is getting in trouble all the time annoying you?”

“Are you sick and tired of getting in trouble all the time?”

These sorts of questions will help us understand whether there is a pain point there for the student and we can use that as leverage to get them to consider change.

A very important principle to consider: When we tell a student or anyone what to do, even if they wanted to do it, the motivation for doing it lowers.  What we need to do, if we’re trying to influence people, is to try to get them to consider the reason why the change may be of benefit to them.  Let’s go back and review:

  • One, we want to acknowledge the resistance; develop rapport.
  • Two, we want to find a pain point; create leverage so the student may consider change or a change in behavior.
  •  Lastly, getting the student to consider why a different behavior would be good for them.  Some  questions like. . .

“Why might you changing be of good benefit to you?”

 “Why do you think coming to school may be good for you?”

I hope these tips are a reminder for those of you who attended the Accidental Counsellor Training in Penrith and for anyone else who may consider coming along. Thank you!

Here are testimonials from attendees at the Accidental Counsellor Training in Penrith 2012

[tboc_button title=”Click here to find out more about the Accidental Counsellor Training and and register online” href=”/accidental-counsellor-training/”]

I find the Accidental Counsellor Training to be useful in terms of new strategies or new techniques on how to work with students.

Carol Wallace, Jamison High School

The thinking from the Accidental Counsellor Training seems straightforward. The strategies helped shift my thinking about “helping” students but practicing it is much harder. It’s very easy to see the benefits, though.

Dan Jones, Cherrybrook Techonology High School

The Accidental Counsellor Workshop was great. Rocky was really dynamic and passionate. It was catching. The content was interesting and the strategies were practical. I was given practical strategies of what to do and was reassured that I’m not expected to work miracles. I feel I can go back to school with something I can put into place.

Laura Hodge, Bossley Park High School

I’ve gotten a lot out of the Accidental Counsellor Workshop due to the clear examples and the time to role play situations with students.

Peter Hartman, Cherrybrook Technology High School

What I learned from the Accidental Counsellor Training is the recognition that the student with the problem or issue needs to want to change and own the change. It is not our job to offer a solution. We need to lead them to decide what and why they want to change. A passionate and believable presenter with realistic and practical strategies. It all makes perfect sense. Thank you!

Anonymous

I really believe the Accidental Counsellor Training would be extremely useful for all teachers to attend. It was thoroughly positive and realistic. It had a great mix of video clips, re-enactments, talk, etc.

Colette Hamilton, Menai High School

The Accidental Counsellor Training was very useful and very applicable to teaching.

Catherine Bargmann, St Clair High School

The Accidental Counsellor Training has provided lots of options of things to try with our students; a different approach to how I usually do things just like getting the students to come up with their own strategies rather than us giving it to them.

Amie Piper, Niland School

You mentioned your wife and daughter so many times. I think having a wonderful, supportive family goes a long way in making a person successful in a “people- helping” job. You’ve been excellent!

Anna Varghese, Model Farms High School

I am so excited to take back and apply what I have learnt over the last two days from the Accidental Counsellor Training. I feel more prepared and equipped to talk to students, meet them where they are at, and challenge and encourage positive behavior. The role plays were so good to be able to think like a student or counsellor and think about people’s perspectives.

Corinne Bessell, Menai High School

There were some great insights I learnt from the Accidental Counsellor Training into seeking information from students.

Richard Harrison, Mount Carmel Catholic High School

The Accidental Counsellor Training gave me lots of ideas to deal with students and how to make school a happy place.

Norbert Jahn, Niland School

Attendees from the following schools joined the Accidental Counsellor Training in Penrith

[tboc_button title=”Click here to find out more about the Accidental Counsellor Training and and register online” href=”/accidental-counsellor-training/”]
  • Jamison High School
  • Mitchell High School
  • Bossley Park High School
  • Good Shepherd Primary
  • Kingswood High School
  • Lynwood Park Public School
  • Mount Carmel Catholic High School
  • Niland School
  • Model Farms High School
  • Magdalene Catholic High School
  • Casula Public School
  • Elderslie High
  • Tregear Public School
  • Cherrybrook Technology High School
  • Menai High School
  • Hoxton Park High School
  • St Clair High School

Conscious Classroom Management Training Parramatta

Here are testimonials from attendees at the Conscious Classroom Management Training in Parramatta 2012

[tboc_button title=”Click here to find out more about the Conscious Classroom Management Training and register online” href=”/conscious-classroom-management-training/”]

This Conscious Classroom Management Training was useful in giving me more strategies to us.

Jennifer Abiwahab, Colyton High School Trade School

The Conscious Classroom Management Training was a great day. The handouts were very good – I can adapt them for primary class. A very helpful workshop.

Angie Burrell, St Paul’s Grammar School

The Conscious Classroom Management Training was a valuable learning experience for me. I have gained ideas and strategies that I will implement in my classes which I believe are effective. Rocky is a great speaker with an abundance of knowledge and experience.
Thanks for your tips! The examples in the booklet appear
useful in terms of targeting specific behaviours. I look forward to reading them in my own time.

Rebecca Zeait, St Joseph’s Primary School

This Conscious Classroom Management training reinforced the strategies I already use in the classroom. I found the handouts most helpful.

Karissa Baines, Walters Road Public School

The Conscious Classroom Management Training provided a great insight into how to help students. The training was easy to understand and definitely applicable.

Lauren Miceli, Mitchell High School

The strategies presented at the Conscious Classroom Management Training were useful, practical and well explained.

Daniel Gardner, Colyton High School Trade School

There were several strategies at the Conscious Classroom Management Training workshop that I was able to walk away with including the small strategies that you could use in different classes.

Catherine Griffin, Birrong Boys High School

Other Comments

The Conscious Classroom Management Training workshop was extremely useful and practical, providing activities I can use in my classroom and reinforcing things I already have in place.

Classroom Management Training Parramatta

The Conscious Classroom Management Training workshop outlined the setting of clear boundaries

from the beginning and getting students to participate in the process.

Practical advice was provided at the Conscious Classroom Management Training workshop – some of it I already use.

The Conscious Classroom Management Training workshop affirmed effective strategies used in the past and refreshed positive rephrasing techniques for use with difficult ‘D’ students.

Attendees from the following schools joined the Conscious Classroom Management Training in Parramatta

[tboc_button title=”Click here to find out more about the Conscious Classroom Management Training and register online” href=”/conscious-classroom-management-training/”]
  • St Paul’s Grammar School
  • New River Leadership
  • St Joseph’s Primary
  • Birrong Boys High School
  • John Palmer Public School
  • Mitchell High School
  • Walters Road Public School
  • Flinders University
  • Colyton High School Trade School

Conscious Classroom Management Sydney 2012

Here are testimonials from attendees at the Conscious Classroom Management Training in Sydney 2012

[tboc_button title=”Click here to find out more about the Conscious Classroom Management Training and register online” href=”/conscious-classroom-management-training/”]

Thank you. The Conscious Classroom Management Training course was interesting and engaging. I feel that it has certainly been beneficial and will be the start of much reflection and change in the running of my classroom and reaction to students’ behaviour.

Vanessa Conrow, Narara Valley High School

Thank you for developing my knowledge about classroom presence and effective classroom management at the Conscious Classroom Management Training.

Susan Stavrou, Our Lady of Lebanon College

It was useful to reflect on the classroom strategies on what is useful and practical at this Conscious Classroom Management Training workshop.

Josip Fairvale High School

It was good to see new techniques to use at the Conscious Classroom Management Training and to know am on right track.

Jeanette Sellars, Narara Valley High School

Many helpful strategies were outlined at the Conscious Classroom Management Training.

Amelie McLean, Blaxland High School

The Conscious Classroom Management Training gave a practical way of implementing the ‘theory’ of classroom management.

Paul Wakelin, Narara Valley High School

The Conscious Classroom Management was very useful. I’m a beginning teacher. I will implement some of these things that I feel I can use in my classroom.

Rebecca Pratt, Beverly Hills Girls High School

The information at the Conscious Classroom Management Training was very useful as gives food for thought, forces us to reflect on our own practises.

Kai-Jung Chen, Catherin McAuley College

The Conscious Classroom Management Training was very well organised and presented. Some stuff seems sooo obvious but it was great.

Kate Wiktorowicz, Kingsgrove High School

The Conscious Classroom Management Training provided practical strategies to implement in classrooms.

Steven Hunt, Narara Valley High School

Attendees from the following schools joined the Conscious Classroom Management Training in Sydney

[tboc_button title=”Click here to find out more about the Conscious Classroom Management Training and register online” href=”/conscious-classroom-management-training/”]
  • Narara Valley High School
  • Fairvale High School
  • Our Lady of Lebanon College
  • Blaxland High School
  • Beverly Hills Girls High School
  • Catherin McAuley College
  • Kingsgrove High School

Conscious Classroom Management Training Liverpool 2012

Here are testimonials from attendees at the Conscious Classroom Management Training in Liverpool 2012

[tboc_button title=”Click here to find out more about the Conscious Classroom Management Training and register online” href=”/conscious-classroom-management-training/”]

I would recommend the Conscious Classroom Management Training to colleagues for the practical approach to classroom management.

Andrews Van Nguyen, Macquarie Fields High School

The Conscious Classroom Management Training was a great professional development, not drowned in theory, but instead providing practical strategies to help in various scenarios.

Peter van der Kley, Macquarie Fields High School

The Conscious Classroom Management Training provided great real life situations that can be applied. A great refresher course for classroom management.

Dena Dahdal, Mitchell High School

This Conscious Classroom Management Training has been absolutely fantastic and truly insightful. I have learnt lots about myself and how my class react on my feeling and attitudes. Thank you and I will be recommending that all teachers at my school at least come to one of your workshops. Thanks again.

Krystal Waite, Caringbah North Public School

The Conscious Classroom Management Training provided a range of strategies, a way of explaining students’ behaviour, a reminder to re-think how we go into a room.

Tracy Law, Hawkesbury High School

It was great at the Conscious Classroom Management Training to be reminded of behavioural management techniques, and to learn some new ones.

Daniel Shaw, Concord High School

The Conscious Classroom Management Training was very practical and gave good examples and fresh ideas for classroom management.

Ashleigh Scocco, Camden Public School

The Conscious Classroom Management Training reinforced many techniques that I am already using and provided new information.

Amanda Smith, Camden Public School

The Conscious Classroom Management Training was a very valuable session with strategies I can use every day in my classroom.

Kate Wilton, Gilroy Catholic College

The Conscious Classroom Management Training was extremely useful and engaging.

Alan Georges, Fairvale High School

The Conscious Classroom Management Training was a great day full of simple and applicable strategies.

Matthew Humphry, Prairiewood High School

Thank you very much for the time you took during the Conscious Classroom Management Training discussing specific needs of students in my class. I had tried everything and felt hopeless/unsure of how to make it to the end of the year. I feel more confident, realise I have been doing the right things and better prepared to go back to the classroom with new strategies.

Sarah Davis, Caringbah North Public School

The tips presented at the Conscious Classroom Management Training were great. Information was relevant to both Primary and High school.
Andrea Bowen, Koonawarra Public School

I liked the practical ideas presented at the Conscious Classroom Management Training, and scenarios discussed. Will surely help me and other teachers in my school. Thanks so much, Rocky. An excellent workshop!
Ni Ketut Ayu Puspita Dewi, The University of Sydney

Attendees from the following schools joined the Conscious Classroom Management Training in Liverpool

[tboc_button title=”CLICK HERE TO FIND OUT MORE ABOUT THE CONSCIOUS CLASSROOM MANAGEMENT TRAINING AND REGISTER ONLINE” href=”/conscious-classroom-management-training/”]
  • Macquarie Fields High School
  • Mitchell High School
  • Caringbah North Public School
  • Camden Public School
  • Gilroy Catholic College
  • Fairvale High School
  • Prairiewood High School
  • Hawkesbury High School
  • Concord High School
  • Koonawarra Public School
  • The University of Sydney

Teacher Professional Development

As any teacher knows, trying to control an entire classroom of young people can be extremely challenging, particularly if there are students who just do not want to cooperate. It can be difficult to know what to do to gain control and respect of the class so that each student gets the most out of their education. A well-managed class is a productive class, where students are engaged and performing at their full potential. Professional development for teachers is vital for learning classroom management strategies, interpersonal skills, and how to deal with behaviour issues.

When it comes to classroom management, prevention is the key to creating a good learning environment. This involves setting ground rules and expectations from the beginning so that students know what the boundaries are. Prevention also involves creating a good connection with the students so that they respect and trust the teacher. Once a good rapport has been established, students will be less likely to act out.

Professional development for teachers can also impart behaviour management strategies that teachers can use to keep the students on track. These could include verbal and non-verbal reinforcement, humour, positive and negative feedback, and rearranging students and work stations for better productivity. Teachers must have a range of methods for ensuring that communication lines stay open and consistency is maintained.

Finally, teacher professional development courses can give educators insight into how to correct a behavioural problem in the classroom. Effective strategies include removing the student from the classroom, diffusing the situation before it gets out of hand, and involving the parents. Experienced teachers know that not every strategy will work with every child, so professional development sessions can give teachers a range of backup options to choose from.

Regardless how long one has been teaching, a teacher professional development course can give a great deal of insight into classroom management techniques, and how to effectively facilitate better behaviour in the classroom. Teachers can learn new methods of how to assert authority, foster communication and respect, and create an environment where students can learn at their full potential. When order is maintained in the classroom, both students and teachers can benefit.

References:   https://humanconnections.com.au/conscious-classroom-management-training/  

Great TED Talks About The Future Of Education And Teaching

There are some interesting and inspiring TED TALK videos on this page.

I recommend you check them out.

The page has a short summary of what the video is about and they are not too long but very worthwile. There are talks by:

  • Ken Robinson: Changing education paradigms
  • Sugata Mitra: The child-driven education
  • Conrad Wolfram: Teaching kids real math with computers
  • Mae Jemison on teaching arts and sciences together
  • Charles Leadbeater: Education innovation in the slums
  • Arthur Benjamin’s formula for changing math education
  • Bill Gates on mosquitos, malaria and education
  • Let’s use video to reinvent education: Salman Khan

Check out the comments of the page because there are other terriffic suggestions about TED TALK videos

Top 12 Ways to Enjoy Your Teaching Job

You work hourly, daily, continually, and purposefully toward creating a school experience that is satisfying for your students. But what about you? What are you doing to ensure that your school is a wonderful place to teach as well as learn?

With summer drawing near, it’s the time to stop counting down the days until break and start enjoying your job.

Here are 12 tips to help you make the most of your school days:

Amp Up Your School Social Life

1. Don’t Hunker Down:

Escape from your classroom once in awhile.While sometimes we need to insulate ourselves, take a quiet moment or maximize our classroom downtime, it’s also imperative that we actively, consistently, and intentionally seek time and space with peers. Use this brief change of scenery and moment away from the classroom to come up for air.

2. Let’s Do Lunch: Eat lunch with your peers, not alone at your desk.

The time you have in school is rarely your own. Lunch is one moment in your day when you get to seek others out. Don’t let this daily opportunity escape you.

3. Total BFFs: Make friends with colleagues.

According to Gallup, people who have a best friend at work are seven times more likely to be engaged in their job. That means that laughing, talking, and sharing time with your colleagues is a part of your job! If this goal isn’t part of your priorities, it should be.

4. Make Peace, Not War: Resolve lingering personal conflicts with colleagues.

What degree of stress walks into the building with you each morning because of a workplace conflict with a colleague? How much energy and joy does this conflict sap from your overall satisfaction with teaching? How would your energy change if this conflict was resolved? You know the answers to these questions. Now go and address it!

Make the Most of Me Time

5. Pencil It In: Schedule moments in your days when you’re NOT available but are in control of your own space and time. Even for a moment.

Making time for yourself is not a bad thing. Catching your breath, taking a moment’s peace, and re-energizing is not only good for you, it’s good for your students and colleagues. They want you peaceful and focused!

6. Loosen the Digital Leash: DON’T email during every free moment.

Little by little, your computer may be eating away at what little spare time you have. Take a weekly technology audit of your time. How much “free” time are you spending on the computer? How else could you spend this time that would better feed you and your energy?

7. The Last Bell: Leave school while it’s still light out.

Are your friends and family happy you do this work? Do you have anything left for them at the end of the day? If not, you need to dedicate yourself to creating boundaries and expectations around your role as an educator that also allow you to play the role of spouse, parent, friend, and partner. Your friends and family will thank you. Your students will too.

8. Sgt. Sleep: Get enough sleep and be militant about this goal.

Even if you stayed up late working every night, your work would never be done. Your students can’t learn when they’re exhausted. You can’t teach when you are either.

Live and Learn Like a Kid (or at least how we tell them they should)

9. Extra-Curriculars: Pursue hobbies, passions, and interests in your own life in the same way that you hope your students do.

Teaching is your job. It’s probably your passion. But that’s not all you do or all you are. Making time for your own pursuits is not only an important part of your own personal development, but also fulfills you in ways that you can then turn back to the people you serve.

10. The Kindness Boomerang: Say your “thank yous” and “good jobs” in hopes that this positivity will come back to you.

If you’re thinking kind thoughts about a colleague, say them. If you’ve been meaning to thank someone for the role they play in your life, do it. Get in the habit of speaking and writing your positive thoughts about others. Odds are, you’ll hear similar thoughts in return.

11. Reawaken Your Curiosity: Learn something new everyday.

Being a life-long learner is part of being a life-long teacher. Read about a subject matter that may or may not pertain directly to your content area. Show your students what love of learning looks like.

12. Play Student: Sit in on a colleague’s class to watch, enjoy, and learn from a peer.

The very best mentor and model you could have may be next door. Make time to watch other professionals in your building. Rather than analyzing the experience, enter into the experience with a goal of pleasure and enlightenment.

How do you stay positive in such a stress-inducing profession? Share in the comments section!

By: Nathan Eklund

Connect and Influence without Burning Out
Accidental Counsellor Training